3 easy ways to tell the church about the Cooperative Program

July 9, 2019

The Cooperative Program supports missions and ministries across North Carolina, North America and around the world. Here are a couple of easy and straightforward ways to educate your congregation on how they are cooperating with other like-minded Baptists across North America.

When you pray before the offering
For most pastors across our state, Sundays are already full of necessary items to include in the service. However, consider taking a moment to pray before the offering. When you pray, you could mention a specific ministry or missions effort that is supported by the financial gifts given. You’re joining more than 50,000 other churches here in North America in an effort to bring hope and the message of Jesus to those who have never heard. And, those prayers not only go before the throne of God who is faithful, but also to educate and encourage your congregation about where their sacrificial giving is going. Consider taking that time to lift up a missionary family in prayer. You probably have access to a missionary family, but if you don’t, check out this prayer resource from the International Mission Board (IMB) or the 52 Sundays resource.

When you send out mission teams
In most cases, the work that’s being done around the world is standing upon a foundation that has already been built through faithful pioneer missionaries. In many cases, your team will be working alongside missionaries and church planters who are supported through the Cooperative Program. So when your team is standing before the church, be sure to mention that the whole church is cooperating and it didn’t start when this team volunteered. Rather, the trip is made possible due to a legacy of faithful obedience to God’s word, prayer and sacrificial giving. If you’re wondering how to get your church more involved in missions both globally and in North America, the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina has a number of partnerships that your church can get involved in.

When you serve your city and community
As Baptists work together, our cooperation must go deeper than our wallets. One of the joys of cooperating together for the mission of God is knowing there are churches in close proximity who share the same heart to share the gospel and serve the community. You’re not alone in the work. So when you are asking those from within your congregation to serve, be sure to mention that there are like-minded churches across our state and nation that are honoring Christ through looking outward to their lost communities. Churches shouldn’t be afraid of reaching out and partnering in camps, evangelism and projects designed to serve the community. This kind of cooperation gives your congregation a sense of validity and encouragement as they honor Christ in obedience.

Before you can engage your city and community effectively, you have to know the needs and demographic makeup of that community. We have a team of people across the state available to help you identify the lostness in your community. To find out more about your area, check out the pockets of lostness map.


by Will Taylor  /  Communications  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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