3 important facts about reaching Asians for Christ

October 26, 2018

There are more than 130 Asian churches and ministries in North Carolina. God has blessed Asian believers in North Carolina by saving them from the bondage of sin and by using them to reach their ethnic groups through evangelism and disciple-making.

It’s easy to forget how important and strategic it is to reach Asians with the gospel. God has brought the nations to us, and it is our responsibility to teach His story to the nations. Here are three facts about Asians that underscore the importance of reaching them with the good news of Jesus Christ.

Diverse people groups
Asia is bigger than you think. When you think of Asians, you may think of people from China, Japan or Korea. While this is correct, Asia is actually far bigger. Asia includes Pakistanis, Yemenis, Saudis and even some Turkish people. While they may all be from the same continent, they all look different and speak different languages.

Diverse religions
In addition to being a large and diverse region, Asia is also a diverse religious continent. Thousands of Hindus, Buddhists and Muslims live in Asia, in addition to a large number of atheists. Asia covers a huge part of “10/40 window,” which is the area of the world between 10 and 40 degrees latitude north of the equator in the eastern hemisphere where a high concentration of unreached people groups reside. There is a lot to be done in Asia.

Diversity in our backyard
In God’s sovereignty, He has brought Asians to the United States. Each year, countless international students, refugees and immigrants find their way to North Carolina seeking shelter, freedom and education on a short- or long-term basis. Between 2000 and 2010, North Carolina’s Asian population grew by 85 percent, which was the fastest rate among southern states and the the third-fastest rate in the nation. Currently, there were more than 300,000 Asians living in North Carolina, who make up approximately 3 percent of the state’s population. God has brought the mission field to our own backyard.


by Sammy Joo  
/  Senior Consultant  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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