3 ways to pray for Charlotte

February 9, 2018

Charlotte is the largest city in North Carolina and one of the fastest growing cities in the country. Yet as the population grows, so do the number of people in the region who are far from God.

Across North Carolina, nine of the top 10 geographic areas that have the highest concentration of lost people are located inside Charlotte’s city limits. These areas, which we call pockets of lostness, abound across the entire metro Charlotte region.

And many of these pockets of lostness have very little gospel influence. In 10 of the 22 pockets of lostness located in metro Charlotte, there are two or fewer North Carolina Baptist churches.

At the same time, many other houses of worship representing other faiths from around the world have sprung up. And across this city, there are nearly 200 languages other than English spoken in homes.

While Charlotte is a hub for economic development and home to several major financial institutions and professional sports franchises, there is a wide and growing disparity between the wealthy and the poor and needy. Approximately, 43 percent of people living in Charlotte make less than a livable wage.

Amidst the increasing ethnic, cultural, religious and economic diversity in Charlotte, we have a tremendous opportunity to reach those who don’t know Christ. Will you join us in praying for this city?

Pray that:

  1. New churches would be planted in areas where there are none.
  2. Existing churches would see, love and serve the lost people around them.
  3. Christians would bring Christ’s hope and healing to the poor, the marginalized and the overlooked in this region.

We can make a difference when we impact lostness through disciple-making.


by  
Dan Collison  /  Strategic Focus Team  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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