5 ways to pray for lostness in North Carolina

April 23, 2018

As the National Day of Prayer approaches on Thursday, May 3, consider how we might pray for our cities, our state, our nation and our world for spiritual awakening. Would you pray for those throughout the world who haven’t heard the wonderful news of the gospel?

Chris Schofield, director of the Office of Prayer for Evangelization and Spiritual Awakening, suggests the following prompts as you pray for the lost in North Carolina. Consider the following in your personal prayers:

1. Pray for personal and congregational revival and revitalization.
We, as God’s people. have departed from God in sin and arrogance. His blessing and favor is waning, and lostness is increasing exponentially. The vital spiritual life of believers and churches is at an all-time low. The Holy Spirit alone must breathe new life into our dead dry bones (Ezekiel 37:7-10).Until we repent and return to Him in godliness and holiness, there will be no rapid-running of the gospel. The psalter cried out in Psalm 85:6-7, “Will You not revive us again, that Your people may rejoice in You? Show us Your mercy, Lord, And grant us Your salvation.” Revival must start with me and my church.

2. Pray for pockets of lostness across North Carolina.
There are 250 identified pockets of lostness in North Carolina where at least 70 percent of the population in that area have no relationship with Christ. Many pockets are marked by ethnic, social, economic, educational and religious diversity. In 1 Timothy 2:1-4, Paul admonishes Timothy to pray for the lost, “Therefore I exhort first of all that supplications, prayers, intercessions and giving of thanks be made for all men. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, Who desires all men to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth.”

3. Pray for the nations.
The world is coming to North Carolina. This includes many refugees, immigrants, migrant workers and international students. The church must pray for and embrace this opportunity to impact the nations with the gospel as internationals are saved and return to their homeland. Psalm 2:8 says, “Ask of Me, and I will give You The nations for Your inheritance and the ends of the earth for Your possession.”

4. Pray for the Lord to raise up and send out disciple-making laborers and church planters.
Although North Carolina has many existing churches, there is a desperate need for believers and churches to see, pray for and embrace the more than 5.8 million lost people in North Carolina with the gospel. New church plants are also needed as lostness steadily increases. Jesus teaches us to pray toward the harvest in Matthew 9:37-38 when He says, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few, therefore pray the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into His harvest.”

5. Pray for God to send a mighty spiritual awakening.
We are in desperate need of God and a fresh movement of His Holy Spirit among His people and upon the lostness in North Carolina. It’s been more than 100 years since the last pervasive spiritual awakening in America and North Carolina. Spiritual awakenings are always preceded and permeated by desperate prayer for God’s mercy, fruit and blessing as believers and churches recognize the spiritual famine in the land. A spiritual awakening always produces fervent witnesses and an unusual openness to Christ, as the gospel runs rapidly among the lost multitudes (2 Thessalonians 3:1). Ezra spurs us on in 2 Chronicles 7:14 as he reminds us, “If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves, and pray and seek My face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land.”


by Chris Schofield  
/  Office of Prayer  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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