6 questions to reframe your ministry vision after COVID-19

March 2, 2021

The coronavirus pandemic has forced us all into new rhythms. Stay-at-home orders for all but the most essential of professionals, caregivers and service providers have dramatically impacted families, businesses and government.

Churches are not immune from this impact. Social distancing has led to the need for creative models of discipleship. We as church leaders send curriculum to families with anticipation that many parents will rise to the challenge of discipling their children. We stream Bible stories, offer application activities, write daily devotions and offer encouragement to weary parents.

When this season of life becomes a scene in our rearview mirrors, what lessons and changes do you hope will remain? What changes will you continue or adapt within the walls of your church? What do you hope will last in the hearts of parents as they disciple their children?

What was your ministry vision before COVID-19?
One of my favorite quotes on vision is from Andy Stanley’s book Visioneering. Vision is “a clear mental picture of what could be, fueled by the conviction that it should be.”

If asked to describe your vision for your ministry before COVID-19, more than likely words such as “children,” “families,” “gospel,” and “disciple” would have been in the mix. If you had to paint a picture of your vision, what would it have looked like? What was the setting for your vision? Was it clear?

What is your ministry vision once COVID-19 has passed?
Chances are you would offer many of the same words as before, but your picture may look different. What “could be’s and should be’s” would your picture include that weren’t there before? What changes could you verbalize?

Would the frame for your vision be the same size as before?
Hopefully the frame for your vision is broader and larger. Is there room for more people? Is the frame still defined solely by the footprint of your church building? Are there people in the picture who were not included before?

What about the colors used to bring the vision to life?
Hopefully, your picture is more techno-colored and less mono-chromatic. Is it more refined and crisp with contours and contrasts? Are there features that have been erased because they are no longer relevant or effective? Is it reproducible and available to be shared with your church and other leaders? Is the vision a place people want to be or want to go?

Where are parents in your vision?
Have you shared the necessary skills and resources so parents can create their own visions for disciple-making in their homes? Have you done more than send them resources? Have you allowed them to lead their children or have you been leading through the video resources you offered? A picture is best enjoyed when it is balanced and hanging straight on the wall.

What is God’s vision for your ministry?
One of the hardest questions to answer about your vision for ministry may be discovering what God says about what really matters and what is bigger than ourselves. What will outlast our personal efforts to make our vision a reality?

Jesus’ initial vision for ministry is from Matthew 4:19:

“Come, follow me and I will make you fishers of men.”

His final vision statement in Matthews 28:19-20 has the same call but is broader in scope and more clearly defined:

“Go, therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the son and the Holy Spirit and teaching them to observe all things I have commanded. And remember I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

How has this time in our history defined, expanded and brought new focus to your ministry vision?


by Cheryl Markland  
/  Childhood Evangelism and Discipleship  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

15 vital things you can give your pastor

October is pastor appreciation month. As a pastor for 25 years, here are some ideas for things your church can give your pastor:Give him a place.Give him a place where he is free to preach the gospel.Give him a place where he is accepted for who he is, not compared to who he...

Why I’m excited about this year’s Pastors’ Conference

The past year has been difficult. The world we live in today looks quite different than it did just 18 months ago. Many things we were accustomed to doing have either disappeared, been restricted, or have changed, for better or worse. One of the biggest changes was the separation...

The local school: A great place for church ministry

For the most part I really enjoyed school. However, there were some aspects of the time that I enjoyed more than others. I enjoyed the learning, the socialization, and of course, the sports. I found most of the assignments manageable with the exception of writing papers. Sitting...

Ready or not, here they come! Evaluating your church with fresh eyes

Is your church ready for guests who may visit your church after first watching online? Are you ready for members who may return after an extended COVID-19 break? What steps can you take to make a great first impression and reintegrate those who want to reengage with your...

Why personal evangelism is a key ingredient for turnaround churches

Many pastors and churches today are struggling. Pastors are discouraged, and some are leaving the ministry altogether. It’s been estimated that more than 80% of churches are plateaued or declining. Yet, some churches are seeing a turnaround. A fresh wind is blowing. These churches...

Looking forward to being on mission together

In late August, a series of organizational changes were unanimously approved by our state convention’s executive committee aimed at advancing all of us forward as a movement of churches on mission together. We’ve been working toward implementing these changes, and I hope that our...

Fostering and adoption: Why forever matters

“Which one is my mommy now?” I never imagined a child asking someone to point out who their mother was. However, the little blonde-haired girl named Ally, who I was holding that day, had already lived with three different families in the span of 15 months since she and her sister...

10 principles for leading in church revitalization

Many churches in our world today are in deep need of revitalization. In order to lead your church in revitalization, there are some basic principles you must follow. Here are 10 principles for a revitalizer: Be humble. You must swallow your pride, humble yourself and love even...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get the latest news and event information by signing up for the Childhood Ministry newsletter.

Select Language ^

Share This

Share this with your friends!