A gospel-centered classroom

April 2, 2019

There seems to be a different curriculum for every church’s children ministry. Curriculums can vary based on the church’s values, mission and needs, but it’s hard to disagree that in any theologically based church the main theme that ties all curriculums together is the gospel. So why not spend 15 minutes at the beginning of class each week explaining the gospel and end class bringing the lesson back to the gospel?

Weave the gospel in
The other day, as I waited for my wife in the foyer of our church, a mother whose third grade child is in my class approached me and called out my full name. Usually when a mom does that it does not go well. But she said, “You cannot stop teaching my son’s third through fifth grade class. Whatever you are doing, keep doing it.”

As she talked more, she explained that as she sat down to do a devotional with her children in 1 Peter, her third grader chimed in. He said, “Oh, 1 Peter 5:10.” The mom, surprised, said, “Yeah. Do you know this verse?” The child replied that it was about restoration. Intrigued, she asked, “What else do you know?” He went through the entire gospel and where to find each point in the Bible.

As I went through my day I was encouraged by this mother’s comments. My desire to disciple my class by focusing on the gospel is making an impact, and not just an impact on that child. Think about all the other children who will hear the gospel because of him — it’s multiplying!

Explain how the gospel fits
I have repeated the gospel countless times, and I have defined words and simplified concepts to help my class see the gospel weaved through the Scripture that we are studying. The great thing about such a presentation is that themes can be added, such as grace and mercy, resurrection, missions, and so on.

It’s reinforcing. Having constant gospel conversations engraves the minds and hearts of children with the truth. It helps bring the Bible together as one big storybook with the overarching theme of the gospel — the greatest love story of all time.

Everyone loves a beautiful building that can stand the test of time. For example, take Notre Dame or Westminster Abbey. You cannot have buildings such as these unless you take your time and build on something firm. You need perfect blueprints and patience. The same goes for the child. I think we can all agree that if Christ is the cornerstone of our faith (Ephesians 2:20) and we repeat that to our children, then a child’s theological foundation will indeed be strong.


by Michael Parry  
/  Member  / North Wake Church, Wake Forest

5 things churches should do differently in 2021

As I am writing this article, I was notified that my grandson, Joshua, had broken his ankle. My granddaughter, Collins, broke her arm this year. My son, Sam, broke his leg a month ago. And my wife, Nellie Jo, broke her wrist earlier this year.   That’s four different Rainer...

So you’re a follower of Jesus: ‘Now What?’

I vividly remember the season when I decided to give up running and join a gym. Up until then I had been an avid runner and enjoyed it. It was a great stress reliever for me, but I didn’t have much physical strength — I was weak and I wanted to change that.    I remember going to...

Finding God’s ‘shells of grace’ in our western culture

The 2016 Disney Pixar film “Finding Dory” details the life of a blue tang fish named Dory who deals with short-term memory loss. The animated movie explores complex issues such as mental health, the power of community, and the interplay between humans and wildlife.    One theme...

Considering a strategic vision for digital engagement

There is a difference between using something and leveraging something. You can use money to buy things you may or may not need. But that does not equate to leveraging it. Leveraging money as an investment could double or triple the initial investment. Using takes something at...

The beauty of adoption

Mom and dad never called me their adopted son. I was just their son. I was born into an unfortunate situation, but I was adopted into a blessed family. In 1966, adoption was not as highlighted in the American church as it is today. In the spring of 1998, I was a seminary student...

5 areas where pastors can grow in the new year

In the optometry profession, 20/20 means clarity or sharpness of vision.    For most people, the year 2020 was anything but clear. In fact, 2020 was as unclear as a year could be because of the repercussions of COVID-19, especially if you are leading in ministry as a pastor.   ...

NC mountain man returns home to plant new church

People say if you live in the North Carolina mountains, they’ll always call you back.   For Michael Childers, that’s pretty much what happened. Except it was God who called him back, not the hills, he says.   Drive to Brevard over in western North Carolina, and then head out of...

Resolve to pray for and encourage your pastor in the new year

Resolve to pray for and encourage your pastor in the new year Happy New Year! I know that those are welcome words for many of us, myself included. Given the events of the past year, we are all ready to return to some semblance of normal, although normal will undoubtedly look...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stay connected by signing up for the N.C. Baptist monthly newsletter.

Select Language ^

Share This

Share this with your friends!