‘And who is my neighbor?’

September 7, 2018

In the parable of the good Samaritan found in Luke 10:25-37, Jesus is asked by a lawyer what he must do to inherit eternal life.

When Jesus responds by asking what is written in the law, the lawyer responds, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your strength, and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.”

After Jesus replies that the lawyer has answered rightly, the lawyer poses another question, “And who is my neighbor?” 

Although the text informs us that the lawyer asked the latter question to “justify himself,” the question of “Who is my neighbor?” is one that we should all ask as Christ-followers.

“Who is My Neighbor?” is the theme for this year’s Baptist State Convention of North Carolina Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for Nov. 5-6 at the Joseph S. Koury Convention Center in Greensboro, N.C. This year’s meeting will feature times of worship, preaching from God’s Word, ministry, reports, business sessions, ministry exhibits and more.

This year’s meeting is now less than two months away, and I hope you are making plans to join us for this special event. Also, make plans to attend the N.C. Baptist Pastors’ Conference prior to the start of annual meeting on Nov. 4-5. You can learn more about annual meeting, the pastors’ conference and a number of other related events and activities at ncannualmeeting.org.

This year’s annual meeting theme is an appropriate one as we seek by God’s grace as a convention of churches to impact lostness through disciple-making. The population of North Carolina is changing, and God is bringing people from all over the world to our state. Acts 17 reminds us that God is sovereign over the movements of people from among the nations so that they might seek and find Him. We have a part to play in God’s plan of taking the gospel to these individuals.

“The population of North Carolina is changing, and God is bringing people from all over the world to our state. Acts 17 reminds us that God is sovereign over the movements of people from among the nations so that they might seek and find Him.”

There are many breakout sessions being planning for this year’s annual meeting that will provide biblical and practical equipping to help you and your church reach your neighbors for Christ, even those who may come from a different ethnic or religious background.

In addition, based on feedback from messengers from our churches, this year’s annual meeting features a revamped schedule that will provide more opportunities for attendees to take part in these times of training and equipping. This year’s schedule will include three separate times allotted for breakout sessions. These will take place on Monday afternoon, Tuesday morning and Tuesday afternoon. I hope you will take advantage of these opportunities.

As we look ahead to this year’s meeting, I ask that you continue to pray for all of the events and activities that will be taking place and for the business that will be conducted. To assist with our personal spiritual preparation for annual meeting, Dr. Chris Schofield from our Office of Prayer has written a new devotional prayer guide for use during our 30-day prayer emphasis in October. Visit prayfor30days.org to access the prayer guide and learn about other ways you can participate in the October prayer emphasis. 

I look forward to seeing you in Greensboro this November, and be sure to visit ncannualmeeting.org for the most up-to-date information about annual meeting.

“But he, wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbor?'” — Luke 10:29 (NKJV)

by Milton A. Hollifield Jr.  /  Executive Director-Treasurer  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

‘Strengthen the Church’ Q&A: Mark Hearn

Mark Hearn serves as senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Duluth, Ga., a suburb of Atlanta that is one of the most diverse communities in the United States. During his tenure as pastor, Hearn has led FBC Duluth to embrace multicultural ministry, a story that has been...

25 suggestions for your summer reading list

What would summer be without a stack of good books? We polled some of the most avid readers from the staff of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina and compiled a list of their picks. With page-turning thrillers, biographies, in-depth theological works and more, there’s...

Lessons learned from an ineffective pastor

Before I came to work at the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, I pastored for 25 years. I learned a lot about who I was as a pastor and about my ineffectiveness. Many times, I worked 60 hours a week, going in different directions, spinning my wheels, and I felt like the...

What’s the link between worship and discipleship?

Mike Harland has served as the director of worship at LifeWay Christian Resources since 2005. He is a Dove Award winning songwriter, a published author, and a worship leader who sings and speaks nationally and internationally. Harland will provide equipping and encouragement for...

12 signs your church may be inwardly focused

Most churches have more of an inward focus than an outward one. That’s one reason Thom Rainer and I many years ago wrote the book, Eating the Elephant – to help established churches turn outwardly. Here are some signs that your church might be inwardly focused: Your church doesn’t...

SBC supports abuse survivors, embraces diversity

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (BP) -- Southern Baptists acted in support of sexual abuse survivors, embraced ethnic and gender diversity and rallied around the Great Commission at their annual meeting June 11-12 in Birmingham, Ala. Messengers strengthened their stance against sexual abuse and...

6 characteristics of godly fathers

Throughout the pages of Scripture, God reveals Himself to us in His Word as our heavenly Father. The Bible tells us that as our perfect Father, God loves us unconditionally, provides for our needs, guides us along life’s journey and will never leave us nor forsake us. These are...

Relearning fatherhood

Relearning fatherhood “It's easy for Christian parents to get lulled into the idea that because you're a Christian parent your kids are going to be Christian kids.” Most guys will admit that they had no idea what fatherhood entailed before becoming fathers, but it was even harder...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Select Language ^

Share This

Share this with your friends!