Disciple-making in a rural context

N.C. BAPTIST PODCAST
February 27, 2018
Subscribe

This podcast was recorded at the Disciple-Making Conference breakout session training and focuses on disciple-making in a rural context. How do you make disciples in a rural context? The same way you do anywhere else, says Jonathan Blaylock, and that is by investing in people God has trusted you to shepherd. Every small town in America is unique, but Blaylock shares practical principles to help small town leaders to intentionally leverage their relationships and guide others to follow and imitate Jesus.

Here is an excerpt from this podcast:

How do you make disciples in a rural context? The same way you do anywhere else. Every small town, rural area is going to be a unique rural area. Your definition of rural in your context, your small town, it looks different than mine. Football might not be a big deal where you guys are. It may be baseball. They might not even play sports. Maybe you’re in a farming community. For us, it’s paper town, it’s paper mill, and I know in my context, I’ve got to respect the paper mill and the people that work there. Making disciples is simply helping others to follow Jesus. There’s this idea in the New Testament of imitation, of looking like, acting like, thinking like, talking like [Jesus]. My goal is to make people that look like Jesus. I want to love people like Jesus loved people. I want to talk to people like Jesus talked to people. I want to act like Jesus. And I want my community to see Christ in me. When Paul says, “Imitate me,” it’s only because he’s attempting and striving to imitate Christ. And if I say, “Imitate me,” it’s only because I’m trying to imitate Jesus. And I would qualify that you imitate me as long as I look like Jesus. If I stop looking like Jesus, don’t imitate me. If you’re a pastor, shepherd who God’s given you. Understand, I want to reach the whole world, just like you do. I want to go into all the nations, just like you do. But God’s given me a certain group of people, in my little town and I need to spend some time with them as well. I’m to shepherd them and to care for them, to love them. Invest in who God’s trusted to you.


by Jonathan Blaylock  
/  Pastor  / West Canton Baptist Church

Mayberry doesn’t exist anymore

“Barney Gets His Man” is a favorite episode from The Andy Griffith Show. In that episode, there’s a high-speed car chase, Andy carries a gun and an African-American citizen can be seen in the background when the criminal is apprehended If that’s the only episode you ever watch,...

We’re not in Kansas (or Old Town) anymore

“I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore” is a classic line from the movie The Wizard of Oz. It’s also a common phrase we use when we feel “out of place.” We sometimes experience that sensation when we’ve lived in one location for many years. Like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz,...

Lift up your eyes

It’s probably happened to you. You didn’t realize how many cars like yours were on the road until you bought one. This model of car you had never noticed before seemed to be everywhere now. It’s funny how things can hide in plain sight. I had a similar experience when our family...

How you can impact lostness

An estimated 5.8 million lost people live in North Carolina and that number is growing. The Strategic Focus Team of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina helps churches take a missionary​ ​approach to North Carolina’s pockets of lostness. Every Baptist across North...

4 ways to pray for the coastal region

The Strategic Focus Team works with churches in eight population centers and other areas across the state of North Carolina. The highest concentrations of lost people are found in and around the eight population centers, which are the Blue Ridge, Coastal, Fayetteville, Greenville,...

Get the latest news and event information by signing up for the N.C. Baptist newsletter.

Select Language ^

Share This

Share this with your friends!