Disciple-making is what we’re made for

February 19, 2018

“What is the chief end of man?” This question has been labored over for centuries since it was penned in the Westminster Catechism in 1646. The answer? “To glorify God and enjoy Him forever.” But why? Why is this our chief end?

Simply put, this is what humans were made for. Disciple-making, then, is fundamentally an invitation into the very life of God. The current condition of North Carolina, however, is far different. More than 5.8 million people in North Carolina don’t have a relationship with Christ and will willfully spend eternity in a Christless agony.

Mankind’s lost condition pained God’s heart so much that He willingly entered into human history to do something about it. Through the person and work of Jesus Christ, God was “reconciling the world to himself…” (2 Corinthians 5:19a). So what is our response as those who have trusted Jesus and received this life? We heed Paul’s charge from that same passage to be “ambassadors for Christ” and to carry on this “ministry of reconciliation,” as we, ourselves, have been reconciled.

What can we do? Our goal as a team of trainers is to accelerate mini-movements of multiplication in 10 regions across North Carolina. The desire is for these movements to consist of streams of disciples making disciples, helping one another to live in, and bring others into, the “life of glorifying and enjoying God forever.” Through training, networking, resourcing and most importantly, the power and leading of the Holy Spirit, we seek to join Him in the joy-filled work of making disciples.

We need to recapture a biblical picture of disciple-making. In his book, The Master Plan of Evangelism, Robert Coleman observes, “The best work is always done with a few. Better to give a year or so to one or two people who learn what it means to overcome for Christ than to spend a lifetime with a congregation just keeping the program going.”

We need to recapture a biblical picture of disciple-making.

To be inspired and informed toward these ends, sign up for the disciple-making newsletter. There will be resources, stories from the field, training schedules and more, giving practical shape to vision as well as, Lord-willing, stirring up your affections for God. Because if any efforts from us are anything other than “to glorify God and enjoy him forever,” we will fail.

May we all be disciples who find our greatest joys in Christ, and who, in turn, make disciples who cherish Him as well. May we give ourselves away so that others may find joy in Him.

I pray that 2018 would be a springboard of disciple-making joy for you and hope that you would consider how you are to be a catalyst of “the chief end of man” around you.


by Josh Reed  
/  DiscipleNC  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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