Disciple-making through word and deed among your immigrant neighbors

N.C. BAPTIST PODCAST
March 6, 2018
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This podcast was recorded at the Disciple-Making Conference breakout session training and focuses on disciple-making that can happen right outside your front door. While most missions work often focuses on overseas ministry, an increasing number of unreached people groups are migrating to the United States; in fact, 43 million people living in this country were born in another one. But what does it look like for believers to have a comprehensive strategy that incorporates serving the needs of unreached people and introducing them to the gospel? Zac Lyons explores the discipleship potential that is waiting outside your home.

Here is an excerpt from this podcast:

Forty-three million people living in the United States were born in another country. Nearly a million international students in our country on a visa to study are getting ready to go back to their own countries. Seventy-five percent of those international students will never enter an American home. Eighty-five percent of international students will return to their home country without having experienced a meaningful relationship with a Christian while they were here. What that means is that Americans, in general, are doing a better job serving international students than Christians are. In North Carolina, we have 300-plus languages that are spoken in our schools. We have identified 158 people groups with population sizes large enough in North Carolina for there to be church planting among these groups. More than 60 of those are considered unreached people groups from around the world—globally less than 2 percent evangelical. Should the church concern itself with the love of unchurched immigrant neighbors? Should the church concern itself with sharing the gospel with unchurched immigrant neighbors? Many times, I see churches do one well, but not the other. They serve communities, but they don’t put the gospel in that context. They share the gospel with these communities, but they don’t give themselves up for them and love them sacrificially. What I want to help you guys do, as believers and members of local churches, I want you to begin to grapple with what does it look like for you to have a comprehensive disciple-making strategy that incorporates both word and deed ministry in your engagement of unreached people groups among us. How can we leverage things that are already in place to make sure we are doing this well and doing it the way Jesus did?

by Zac Lyons  /  Great Commission Partnerships  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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