Discipleship in the 21st century

N.C. BAPTIST PODCAST

 

March 6, 2018

 

This podcast was recorded at the Disciple-Making Conference breakout session training. The world has never been so connected to information and yet so disconnected with personal relationships. Communities of people unengaged with the gospel are a part of a rapidly changing culture that values instant gratification and consumer mentality. This brings unique challenges to those seeking to follow Christ’s command to make disciples, a mandate that has remained the chief purpose of believers for centuries. Does discipleship and relationship become smaller as church attendance grows larger? Matt Curry discusses how to go back to the basics to be a more effective disciple-making church in such a fast-moving world.

Here is an excerpt from this podcast:

The reality is, this isn’t a new concept. For over 2,000 years, we’ve been trying to figure out ways to make disciples. Realistically, though, the 21st century brings some obstacles, some unique challenges, to what we’re trying to accomplish. We live in a modern world, where everything is fast, everything’s right now, consumer mentality, and many of you who serve in churches know that mentality. It’s turned into a “go big or go home” type attitude: bigger cars, bigger houses, bigger jobs. That’s what wins. This is what American church has turned into. Yes, we want a lot of people to sit under the gospel. But I would say the question is: What are we doing with those people? When they hear the gospel, when they’re able to respond to the gospel, at that point, we kind of go, ‘Praise the Lord, we’ve won!’ We’ve crossed them over the finish line when in reality, it’s the starting line. Bigger equals better; it really does. But the question is: Are you becoming smaller as you become larger? Because we have to be able to get folks in community, to live with one another, to carry out each other’s burdens, to be with one another in the way that we are connected. God built us that way. So we want to make sure we understand that responsibility of discipling those people. Over time, the size of the crowd seems to have paralyzed many of our churches. We neglect discipleship because we are enamored with the crowds. We want more people in front of us. Again, that’s a good thing. Why are we so driven by those numbers? When you stand up in the pulpit, when you look out in the crowd, how many people can you lock eyes with and know they are disciples who are making disciples?


by Matt Curry  /  Spiritual Development Pastor  /  Apex Baptist Church

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