Floyd’s 5 keys for transforming the culture in the SBC

October 4, 2019

I recently had the privilege of attending the inauguration service for Dr. Ronnie Floyd, the new President and CEO of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) Executive Committee, on Monday, Sept. 16 at First Baptist Church in Nashville, Tenn.

It was a wonderful worship service with music, personal testimonies and a stirring message from Dr. Floyd. On several occasions throughout the service, we paused to spend time in prayer for Dr. Floyd, his new work and the work of the SBC. I hope that you will join me in praying for the things that we prayed for during that service. Pray for Dr. Floyd, his ministry and the work of our convention.

Dr. Floyd is a man who is passionate about prayer, personal evangelism and proclaiming the gospel to the ends of the earth. While I was in Nashville, Dr. Floyd outlined what he termed as five keys for transforming the culture in the Southern Baptist Convention. They are:

1. Living and breathing gospel urgency.
2. Empowering all churches, all generations, all ethnicities and all languages.
3. Telling and celebrating what God is doing.
4. Loving others like Jesus loves.
5. Reaching the world for Christ.

All of these keys undergird Dr. Floyd’s vision of reaching the world for Christ. He says whatever the cost and whatever the risk, this worldwide mission thrust must be our priority.

Whatever the cost and whatever the risk, this worldwide mission thrust must be our priority.

In the days ahead, I’m sure you’ll be hearing more about his refreshing vision for Southern Baptists. And if you haven’t already made plans to attend this year’s Baptist State Convention of North Carolina Annual Meeting in Greensboro this November, I want to personally invite you to come hear Dr. Floyd in person. Before coming to serve in his new role of leadership, Dr. Floyd was senior pastor of The Cross Church in northwest Arkansas. God blessed this congregation to see around 1,000 people baptized each year.

On Tuesday, Nov. 12, at 6:15 p.m. during the closing session of the meeting, Dr. Floyd will be preaching during a special worship service related to the SBC’s current “Who’s Your One?” evangelism initiative. During our time together, Dr. Floyd will challenge North Carolina Baptists to be more diligent in the area of personal evangelism. I challenge you to begin praying now that God will do a great work in transforming lives during this worship service.

As we prepare for this special night with Dr. Floyd, I want to also issue a personal challenge to North Carolina Baptists. As we focus on “Who’s Your One?” during the service that Tuesday night, bring someone with you who doesn’t yet know Christ.

In addition to being stirred toward evangelism ourselves, I’ve asked Dr. Floyd to give an evangelistic invitation at the conclusion of his message. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to see a move of God and see people trust in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior right there at the annual meeting? Will you join me in praying for our annual meeting and the service with Dr. Floyd?

I hope to see you there. Be praying for your “one” and bring them with you or ask them to meet you at the Koury Center on Tuesday evening, Nov. 12. The session starts at 6:15 p.m. and the worship service will begin at 7:15 p.m.

For more information on this year’s annual meeting, visit ncannualmeeting.org.

“Likewise, I say to you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.” — Luke 15:10 (NKJV)


by Milton A. Hollifield Jr.  
/  Executive Director-Treasurer  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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