How to make discipleship part of your family's rhythms

May 26, 2020

Honestly, most days are a blur. Mornings are a flurry of getting ready for school and work. Days are a blur between work deadlines, after-school activities and traffic.

At the end of most of my days, all I want to do is sit in my recliner, kick my feet up and relax — but there’s still, dinner to cook, homework to help with and kids to get ready for bed. If your days sound anything like mine, the thought of adding one more thing to an already full plate might sound overwhelming.

The truth is, we don’t need to add anything to our plates. Instead, daily routines need to be redeemed to make room for discipleship to flourish in our homes. Deuteronomy 6:7 says, “You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.”

Based on this verse, here are some simple suggestions to begin incorporating discipleship opportunities into your daily rhythms:

The goal is not to add anything more to your schedule, but instead use the rhythms you already have in your life to be intentional about making disciples in your home and in the world.

  1. When you rise.
    Think of this as your morning routine. If you have your quiet time in the morning, consider doing it a few days out of the week in an area where your children can see you. Never underestimate the power of personal example. It can go a long way in teaching and encouraging your children to have their own personal time with the Lord.
  2. When you walk by the way.
    Perhaps this is your daily commute. It’s likely that we’ll never have a more captive audience with our children than in the car, as they are quite literally locked in. Car rides can be an incredibly valuable time with your children. Whether it’s practicing memory verses in the car rider line, talking about the beauty of God’s creation you see along the way, or praying for your child before you drop them off at school or practice, riding together in the car is a readily redeemable time for the discipleship of our children.
  3. When you sit at home.
    This could be over a family dinner or in the quiet of your living room. When we redeem the time we have at home, we can transform it from a place where we continually retreat from the world to a place where we strategically engage it. At least once a month, invite a neighbor over for dinner and get to know them. If the opportunity presents itself, share your testimony. At the very least, pray for them. In doing so, you will model for your children what it looks like to build relationships with gospel intentionality.
  4. When you lie down.
    While this speaks for yourself, bedtime routines are something many parents have already established, so tweaking them just a bit may prove to be the easiest to do. If you read a bedtime story each night, consider making it a Bible story. If you pray with your child each night, pray specifically for a person to share the gospel with. If you review your day, ask your child how they saw God’s grace in it.

Remember, the goal is not to add anything more to your schedule, but instead use the rhythms you already have in your life to be intentional about making disciples in your home and in the world.


by Jamie Burkett  /  Associate Pastor of Students  /  Gate City Baptist Church

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1 Comment

  1. Phyllis Foy

    Wonderful advice, your children will grow in the Lord, you wil always be glad you took the opportunity and regret when you did not.

    Reply

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