Intentional teachers

June 11, 2019

One day, my study time was focused on how parents can help their children learn God’s Word. As I meditated on different passages, the Lord gave me an idea on how to best communicate and illustrate this important concept. Before I took my next breath, I was thumbing through the contact list on my phone to find Zach Bumgarner’s number. Zach was a former student in my youth ministry who was playing football at the college level. I asked him, “How does your coach teach your football team new plays?”

Setting up a game plan
Zach described how the coach gathers the offensive team together in a classroom and takes them through the play. His goal is to thoroughly explain the play until his players have a solid grasp on how it works. Then they go out to the practice field for the second step — the “walk-through.” Each player stands in his designated spot and simply walks to the proper location prescribed by the play. When all the players have been sufficiently drilled and the coach is satisfied with their performance, he has the offense put on their practice uniforms for the third step — the most critical part of the practice.

Fully dressed with pads and helmets, the coach has his offensive players set up to run their new play. This time, however, they are faced by the defensive unit. They run the play until they have worked out all the kinks and can execute the play to perfection. The team runs and reruns the same play because repetition is key.

Zach went on to the fourth part of their process — accountability. There are points during the game when the coach can make any necessary adjustments (or chastise a player). After their contest, the team watches film of the game to critique plays and learn where improvements are needed.

How well is the church equipping the parents to be the primary disciple-makers of their homes?

A model for parents
Zach laid out an excellent model for moms and dads to intentionally disciple their children.

The coach used the two methods of teaching that Moses describes in the book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrew word “shanan” means to intensively and intentionally teach in a repetitious way. The coach employed the “shanan” teaching style to introduce his offense to their new play. Repetition was one of the key ingredients he used to teach his team. Understandably, this technique made the new play become second nature to the team.

The second method the coach used to help his players learn the new play is by what educators refer to as the three primary ways of learning — visually, auditorily or kinesthetically. Moses, on the other hand, calls this the “lamad” teaching style.

Deuteronomy 11:19 says, “Teach them to your children, talking about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.”

How do you cause someone to learn? Proverbs 22:6 says, “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” Each person has a unique coding that enables them to learn. Instead of asking how well moms and dads are preparing their kids for game day, maybe we need to ask this question: How well is the church equipping parents to be coaches — the primary disciple-makers of their homes?


by Mark Smith  /  
Family Evangelism and Discipleship  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

Conference to emphasize ‘Gospel Above All’

There is nothing more important in life than the gospel of Jesus Christ. Everyone needs to hear the gospel, and as followers of Christ, we never outgrow our need for the gospel. The message of Jesus Christ’s death, burial and resurrection is both life-changing and life-altering....

“21st century Moses”

In 2004, God gave me a clear vision to raise up leaders who have the kind of faith Moses had. Just as God met Moses and sent him back to Egypt to bring his people to the Promised Land, God will meet immigrants today and send them back home to spread the gospel — we just have to...

Are our blindspots preventing racial reconciliation?

Are our blindspots preventing racial reconciliation? “Part of being human is having blindspots. My experience opens my eyes to some things yet blurs my vision on some other things.” Walter Strickland, assistant professor and associate vice president for diversity at Southeastern...

Two churches in one building

Five years ago, in a yearly planning meeting with the staff of Flint-Gloves Baptist Church, two simple and straightforward questions were posed that would radically change our church: 1. Are we being good stewards of all that God has entrusted to us? 2. Has God given us resources...

Room at the table

James, the brother of Jesus Christ, defines the fruit of true religion: “Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world” (James 1:27).Jan. 19 is Sanctity of Human Life...

Q&A: Jimmy Scroggins on leadership, vision, evangelism, church culture and more

Jimmy Scroggins is lead pastor of Family Church in South Florida. He is dedicated to building families in South Florida through a network of neighborhood churches that help people in their community discover and pursue God’s design. Scroggins will be the keynote speaker at this...

The Great Commission begins at home

It’s a fundamental truth that every person who walks through your church’s door on any given day was raised in a home by a family. The shape of their family and type of home will, no doubt, be unique to the individual. But, this fundamental truth still applies. The reason I share...

Embracing change is perilous and priceless

Embracing change is perilous and priceless “At a time when many Baptist churches are closing their doors, the testimony that has been repeated over and over is, ‘Our neighborhood has changed, but we didn’t.’” This was the observation of Mark Hearn, senior pastor of First Baptist...

]

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Select Language ^

Share This

Share this with your friends!