Strive for racial reconciliation

February 6, 2018

I’m thankful for the strong stands and statements against the sin of racism that have taken place within our denomination, particularly during the past year.

North Carolina Baptists were among at least five state conventions that adopted resolutions denouncing racism during their respective annual meetings last fall, joining Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma and the Southern Baptist Convention of Virginia.

Those measures on the state level came just a few months after messengers attending the national SBC annual meeting last June in Phoenix, Arizona, passed a resolution “On the Anti-Gospel of Alt-Right White Supremacy.” Resolutions that were adopted in North Carolina and other states affirmed the sentiments expressed by the resolution adopted by the SBC.

In written comments made to Baptist Press, Russell Moore, president of the SBC’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), said he thanked God “that our denomination has committed itself to opposing the satanic scourge of racism and to promoting racial unity.”

“If someone says, ‘I love God,’ and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he has seen, how can he love God whom he has not seen?” — 1 John 4:20

I am glad that our state and national conventions have let it be known that racism in any form or expression is antithetical to the very gospel of Jesus Christ that we proclaim. Yet even as these resolutions were adopted, we saw ugly incidents and demonstrations across our land which showed that racism is still alive in our nation and underscored the reason why such statements need to be made by our denomination.

Although we have made good strides in our nation and even in our own denomination related to racial reconciliation and race relations, there is still a lot of work that remains to be done. While I applaud the resolutions that have been adopted and statements that have been made, I know that no resolution or statement about race or any other issue can change a person’s heart and attitude. However, God can and He is willing to do that so you can change your behavior.

Consider the question that John the apostle asks in 1 John 4:20 about how can we profess to love God when we do not love our brother? I encourage us all to prayerfully examine our hearts both individually and corporately and then repent of any of the sins of racism that the Holy Spirit exposes to us.

Ask God to help you love individuals you have not loved because of their ethnicity. Reconcile means to come into a new and positive relationship with another person. Establish new relationships and show mutual respect to all people.

While I am thankful for a day like Racial Reconciliation Sunday, let’s strive for racial reconciliation every day and not just one day.


by Milton A. Hollifield, Jr.  
/  Executive-Director Treasurer  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

Race: A gospel issue

The book of Ephesians has a lot to offer the church in the present day and age. Chapters 1-3 explain what Christians should believe, followed by chapters 4-6 which detail how to rightly apply the gospel to the Christian life. Ephesians 2:11-16 carries specific importance regarding one issue that majorly confronts the church today — race.

Undivided: Your church and racial reconciliation

In a time of much division and hostility within our churches, the North American Mission Board has provided a free resource that aims to move congregations from low points of ignorance and struggle, to genuine gospel community. Dhati Lewis, lead pastor of Blueprint Church in Atlanta and J.D. Greear, lead pastor of The Summit Church in Raleigh and newly elected president of the SBC, come together to talk about division along party lines, poverty lines and, especially, racial lines.

How to promote racial reconciliation in your church

It’s easy to think that because we are 50 years past the Civil Rights Movement, we are now in a place to move on. Because we are now united under law, let’s work even harder to be united under Christ. We have not arrived, and therefore ask the Lord to give you eyes to see the work yet to be done.

7 ways to pray for racial reconciliation

Several pastors from across North Carolina contributed the following prayer points as we prepare our hearts to pray for racial reconciliation in our state, nation and world. These prayer points are also available as a free download for use in your church using the links below.

Strive for racial reconciliation

North Carolina Baptists were among at least five state conventions that adopted resolutions denouncing racism during their respective annual meetings last fall, joining Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma and the Southern Baptist Convention of Virginia.

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