What is a Pocket of Lostness?

N.C. BAPTIST PODCAST
March 6, 2018

This podcast was recorded at the Disciple-Making Conference breakout session training and focuses on understanding pockets of lostness. Think of a pocket of lostness as a gospel desert—a small geographic area with a large percentage of lost people. North Carolina has 250 pockets of lostness, where the general population grows or changes faster than the church, which then creates barriers to ministry. Cris Alley presents their locations, explores their causes and introduces the steps churches can take to eradicate lostness in North Carolina’s gospel deserts.

Here is an excerpt from this podcast:

What we’ve found is that lostness in North Carolina is indeed growing fast. It’s growing unusually fast in certain locations. And more than likely, it’s a location within just a few miles of where you live, if you’re not living in one of those locations. We also have begun to discover what’s driving this growth. By understanding that, then, we’ve got a better idea of how to go after it a little more strategically. Jesus says, “Lift up your eyes and look unto the fields because they are ripe for harvest.” That’s what I want to do today. I want to help us lift our eyes up and look at these fields. I’m telling you what we’re finding. They might not be easy fields, but they are ripe for harvest, and sometimes they are hiding right in plain sight. Think of a pocket of lostness as a gospel desert. Over here we’ve got our city, we’ve got our water supply, we’ve got our mountains, and then over here we’ve got our desert. Sometimes in desert or water shortage situations, you have more people than you have water. Sometimes things get in the way of the water. Sometimes you have a long way to walk to get to the water. People don’t live in deserts; they die in deserts. How does this apply to gospel deserts? Population, barriers or distance can create gospel deserts. Sometimes the population grows faster than the church. Sometimes the population changes faster than the church, and these changes create barriers. Sometimes the population grows distant from the gospel, and there are different levels of understanding of the gospel.

by Cris Alley  Strategic Focus Team  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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