When your gospel conversation turns awkward

April 2, 2018

“Awkward conversations change lives.”

I don’t know where I first heard this statement, but it stuck with me.

Sharing the gospel with others can be one of the most nerve-racking experiences for Christians. It is an eternally meaningful moment. Despite our reasons to be nervous, however, we know that the Holy Spirit has been preparing the heart of that person, so we can have confidence even in the midst of our awkwardness. That’s a good principle, but it can be difficult to jump from principle to practice if we don’t have a process.

We want to see gospel conversations take place as naturally and as frequently as possible. It may sound counterintuitive, but one of the best ways to make this transition happen more instinctively is to practice using a transitional statement — or what we call 7 Seconds of Insanity.

How do you do it? Try one of these:

  1. “Has anyone ever shared the gospel with you before?”
  2. ”Hey, would you say you’re near to God or far from God?
  3. “Could I show you a simple picture that helped me come near to God?”

These questions may seem overly simple; that’s by design. In any general conversation that I’m trying to turn into a gospel conversation, I want one single question in my mind that helps me make the jump. When our nerves might get the better of us, having one or two simple bridging questions like this can help us take the leap from a general conversation into a gospel conversation with confidence.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Mike Puckett serves as the Executive Director for the Baptist Collegiate Ministry of the High Country. For more information about him and his ministry, visit his blog. For more information on #NoPlaceLeft and the Baptist Collegiate Ministry of the High Country visit bcmhighcountry.com/no-place-left/.

by Mike Puckett  /  Executive Director  /  Baptist Collegiate Ministry of the High Country

Blessings and benefits of bivocational & covocational ministry

What if having a job outside of your church turned out to be one of the greatest blessings that you have ever experienced in your pastoral life? Though full-time vocational ministry may be commonplace in America, this phenomenon is only about 100 years old. Before pastors worked...

3 questions your church should ask before gathering again

As we entered the new decade on Jan. 1, 2020, I doubt anyone expected that within the next 90 days most of our weekend worship gatherings would be halted and moved online. Who could have imagined an Easter where we would gather with our families in front of computer screens,...

Plant a church? Who, me?

I remember well the years of confusion about God’s call to plant a church. I had so many questions concerning the need for more churches, my personal calling and my personal motive for starting a new church in the first place. I also found myself thinking, “Am I crazy for wanting...

Two churches in one building

Five years ago, in a yearly planning meeting with the staff of Flint-Gloves Baptist Church, two simple and straightforward questions were posed that would radically change our church: 1. Are we being good stewards of all that God has entrusted to us? 2. Has God given us resources...

Restoring great joy to church plants

One of the first things I ask potential church planters is, “What do you want your church plant to be like?” A visionary planter will usually respond by sharing about their future meeting space, the type of music they will use for worship and a description of the culture they want...

Churches are meant to reproduce

Church Planting N.C.’s (CPNC’s) core values focus on deepening relationships with planters and reproducing churches. Previously, we explored our first core value “tribe.” Now let’s explore our second core value which is “reproduce.” Churches are meant to reproduceDuring my early...

The treasure of tribe

Mass shootings, political strife, threats of war, the daily onslaught on the soul of our children — say what you will, but our world is rapidly changing, if not declining. With so much uncertainty in our world, one thing remains steady and sure: America desperately needs Jesus,...

Why we need more churches

Do we really need more churches? As one who leads church planting efforts for the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina (BSCNC), you would expect my answer to unequivocally be “Yes and amen!” But I also realize that I live in “church-planting world.” Daily, I find myself...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stay connected by signing up for our monthly newsletter and events email.

Select Language ^

Share This

Share this with your friends!