4 keys to choosing the right Bible study curriculum

February 13, 2020

It is vitally important that you choose the right curriculum for your ministry. If you don’t, you could derail what you are trying to accomplish.

But when it comes to resources for almost any church ministry, you will find that there are hundreds of choices on the market. So how can you know what’s right for your church?

Fortunately, some practical considerations can help you narrow down what curriculum will work best for your church. Here are some things to keep in mind.

1. The right curriculum will be Bible-centered.
There is no room for margin on this question. Be sure to explore the doctrines and theological background of the publishing company/author, as well as the doctrines being taught in the curriculum.

2. The right curriculum will meet the needs of your local church.
When considering the specific needs of your group, include things like class size, budget, location, age or spiritual background.

3. The right curriculum will support your teachers’ preparation and delivery of the lesson.
It should include resources that equip your teachers and give them the tools to be effective and meet the needs of their students.

4. The right curriculum will speak to your learners.
It should encompass real life applications, helping them to become stronger Christ-followers.

Here are some additional questions you should ask to help ensure you are choosing the best curriculum to disciple learners:

  • Does the curriculum cover all of the Bible’s content and not just selected or favorite parts?
  • Does it have a balance of Bible study approaches and life issues?
  • Does it reflect your church’s theological positions?
  • Is it properly sequenced so that the learner can build on what they already know?
  • Are the studies designed so that the leader can build on what they already know?
  • Does the curriculum support an ongoing ministry?
  • Can unsaved people or people with little church background understand the lessons?
  • Are learners encouraged to continue Bible study throughout the week?
  • Does the curriculum guide teachers into personal Bible study so that God can speak to them before teaching?
  • Does the curriculum support evangelism?
  • Does the curriculum offer a wide variety of interactive, age-appropriate learning activities?
  • Does the teaching plan engage a wide spectrum of learners through a variety of methods that reflect multiple learning approaches?
  • Does the curriculum affirm and support the home as the center of biblical learning?
  • Is the curriculum culturally sensitive?

Taking the time to examine Bible study curriculum by asking important questions such as these is crucial to finding the curriculum that is right for your ministry.


by Sandy Coelho 
/  Leadership Development Coordinator  /  Baptist Convention of New England

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