Sisters, lift up your eyes

March 13, 2019

Let’s face it, if you claim to be an authentic biblical woman you will no doubt be in a constant fight to live counter to our culture. It’s a good fight, but it is an exhausting fight. What’s right is wrong, and what’s wrong is right. It’s confusing, it’s discouraging and it’s even depressing.

The weight of the sin of this age is like the cumbersome bundle depicted on the back of Christian in John Bunyan’s popular book Pilgrim’s Progress. For many Christian women, this immense burden is carried throughout our days as we care for children, homes and careers.

Additionally, our culture is pressuring us to have an opinion about women’s issues, as well as to advocate in ways that previous generations have not. If we have the opportunity, it is a great privilege to be a voice for those who are wounded, but it is also very difficult to appropriate our boldness and equally honor our brothers in Christ. Too often we see divisiveness and antagonism lead the charge, and what is left behind is even more brokenness.

If we, as Bible-believing, Spirit-led women, are going to make a difference, we must be willing to lift our eyes to the One who can be our advocate in times of unrest. Our fight must begin on our knees. Then, we must be disciplined to faithfully seek wisdom from the Word.

John Piper defines wisdom in a way that has great practical application for women as we face these multifaceted areas of our lives. In a sermon titled “How to Get Wisdom,” Piper says, “The greatest human wisdom is the factual knowledge and the situational insight and the necessary resolve that together have the greatest likelihood of success in achieving the intended, righteous goal.”

If we, as Bible-believing, Spirit-led women, are going to make a difference, we must be willing to lift our eyes to the One who can be our advocate in times of unrest.

As I dissect this definition, It helps me see it in the following ways:

Factual knowledge is objective. It is what we see and cognitively observe to be true. This is where we use our eyes and our brain. It’s vital that we fight to keep our emotions at bay and leave subjectivity dormant.

Situational insight is where we see current reality and context, but accurately perceive what is not seen. It is where spiritual discernment comes into play. Discernment and discretion require more than just a cognitive analysis. This is a supernatural work of the Spirit.

Finally, necessary resolve is boldness and strength to do or say what is right. It requires strength from above. We must rely on the strength of the Spirit (2 Timothy 1:7).

Dear sisters, as you fight the good fight for our Lord, lift up your eyes, pray for wisdom and seek answers from the Word. Only then can you successfully advocate for others and advance the gospel.

As you think about different women in the Bible, what characteristics set them apart that can help us navigate our culture?


Kathryn Carson
/  Communications Team Leader  /  Baptist State Convention of North Carolina

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